Blog — neurotransmitters

Collection Timing Matters for Urine Testing

Posted by Ben White on

By Dr. Kate Placzek ZRT Laboratory Urine is rapidly becoming the preferred medium for neurotransmitter testing to ensure objective neurobiological assessment. This is because a) urine is the primary route of peripherally-produced neurotransmitter elimination; and b) it is non-invasive and cost-effective. This blog takes a look at how dried urine testing provides a superior advantage over standard liquid urine collection methods. Is a 24-hour collection necessary – or even desirable? The gold standard of neurotransmitter testing in urine involves an inconvenient and mildly embarrassing collection of liquid urine over a period of 24 hours into a jug. The awkwardness of...

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Clinical Pearls - Getting the Most Out of Your Neurotransmitter Test

Posted by Ben White on

By Dr. Kate Placzek ZRT Laboratory As with any functional test that measures physiological function, the challenge lies in the interpretation of subclinical levels of measured parameters. However, it is within those subclinical levels that the neurotransmitter test becomes a powerful tool to identify what is contributing to a specific patient's health issues and how to map toward a successful outcome based on an individual treatment plan. Learning how to use a new test can be overwhelming, especially when it goes back to neurology which you might not have thought of since medical school. To assist health care providers in approaching neurotransmitter testing...

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Menopause – Is It All In Your Head?

Posted by Ben White on

By Dr. Kate Placzek, ZRT Laboratory Estrogen.  We've heard Dr. Zava call it the "angel of life, and the angel of death." Too much can be hazardous. Too little can be problematic also.  Not many people realize this, but estrogen plays a role in more bodily functions than just reproduction. In fact, estrogen has many important functions in the brain.  Studies show that decreasing levels of estrogen can cause two of the most common perimenopause symptoms – hot flashes and mood fluctuations. Curious how this happens? Read on to learn the details of this biochemistry.  SUMMARY The main focus of this blog is the time in a woman’s life...

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Neurotransmitters, Mood & the Perception of Stress

Posted by Ben White on

When we talk about “stress,” or allostatic load, in terms of the perception of an event, we must realize that these “events” must first be translated into neurochemical signals before they trigger the HPA axis. Therefore, the sensitivity and outcome of translating these events (whether they are ongoing events, memories of past events, or stressful anticipation of unrealized events), is highly dependent upon signaling from other neurotransmitters. In fact, the signaling neurotransmitters that manage mood and affect often overlap with measures of HPA axis activation, and cannot be easily distinguished in some subjects. [1] While the detailed influence of neurotransmitters, such...

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Mineral Imbalances & ADHD (Part 1: Zinc Deficiency & Copper Excess)-Final Focused

Posted by Ben White on

What if there was a safe, effective, inexpensive, and simple way to help treat one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders of childhood? Health care professionals often overlook nutrients; yet imbalances in many minerals are frequently seen in medical disorders including ADHD. Fortunately, replenishing nutrients with an integrative treatment plan has proven to be an effective treatment for the symptoms of ADHD. In this two-part series, we will evaluate mineral deficiencies in zinc and magnesium, excess copper, and their relationship with neuropsychiatric symptoms. Minerals Essential for Health Minerals are inorganic substances essential for cell metabolism, neurotransmitter synthesis, growth, and development....

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